News

Women Investors: Toss the Piggy Bank, Be Less Risk Averse

Research Shows Women’s Investment Anxiety Thwarts Financial Goals

(Rye, NY) – New research into women investors offers financial advisors insights to address the needs and growing demands of this varied market segment, especially risk-averse women investors who hold too many assets in cash, according to Hearts & Wallets, the preeminent financial research resource for understanding consumer savings and investing needs and behaviors.

Women investors hold far more cash than male investors, allocating on average 37 percent of assets to bank savings or checking accounts or CDs compared to 25 percent for men.1 Men have almost double the allocation in individual stock holdings of women – 13 percent versus 8 percent – and 15 percent the allocations in stock mutual funds, compared to women’s 10 percent allocation. Read More→

Investors Rank “Clear Pricing” and “Low Fees” No. 1 Edward Jones, USAA, Ameriprise Among Top Performers

Despite Desire for Fee Clarity, Less Than One in Four Understands How Primary Provider Earns Money

(Rye, NY) – Investors rank “clear and understandable pricing” as their No. 1 Investor Want for investment providers – yet less than one in four has a good understanding of how their primary provider earns money – in a survey of approximately 5,500 U.S. households nationally by Hearts & Wallets, the preeminent financial research resource for understanding consumer savings and investing needs and behaviors.

Americans grew more demanding for all the Top 10 Investors Wants in 2014, with fee clarity shooting up four points from 2013 to share the top spot with low fees in the annual survey: Read More→

Americans Grow 16 Percent Richer in One Year; Ages 65 to 74 Gain Most in Assets, thanks to Taxable Assets and Stocks

Older Americans Control 25 Percent of Retirement Funds, Seek Advice

(Rye, NY) – Americans grew wealthier last year with total household investable assets up 16 percent annually, and seniors ages 65 to 74 enjoyed the largest increase in aggregate wealth of any segment, according to the 2014 Portrait of U.S. Household Wealth: Market Sizing, Segmentation and Product Ownership by Hearts & Wallets, the preeminent financial research resource for understanding consumer savings and investing needs and behaviors.

Total U.S. investable household assets reached $41.2 trillion at year-end 2013, up from $35.4 trillion the prior year. Earlier increases from 2009 to 2012, ranged from around 12 percent to more than 5 percent as Americans slowly recovered from the Great Recession’s significant dent to household assets in 2008. Read More→