News

U.S. Savings Rate Jumps to 5.5%, One Fourth Save Nothing; Top 10 Statistics of U.S. Household Finance Throughout Life

Online Planning Tools Boost Savings, Especially for Lower Income

(Rye, NY) – The average household’s savings rate jumped to 5.5 percent in 2014, up from 4.6% percent in 2013, but the picture of household wealth isn’t all positive. One-fourth of all Americans saved nothing, and younger and less affluent consumers struggle with more non-mortgage debt, according to a new study of household finance throughout life by Hearts & Wallets, the preeminent financial research resource for understanding consumer savings and investing needs and behaviors. Read More→

Research Reveals Consumer Preference for “Chunk or Nothing” Retirement Spending Behavior, Despite Shroud of Shame

Opportunity to Offer New Financial Solutions for Joyful Last Chapter of Life

(Rye, NY) – Consumer behavior reveals a marked preference for “chunk or nothing” spending and savings behavior, yet older investors feel intense guilt breaking open the retirement nest egg, according to new research by Hearts & Wallets, the preeminent financial research resource for understanding consumer savings and investing needs and behaviors.

Conditioned to think in terms of steady income withdrawals by current product messaging, older people are caught between industry expectations and their own desires. The study, Optimizing the Last Chapter: What Pre-Retirees Want From Their Money & How “Chunk or Nothing” Behavior Affects Service & Product Design for Personal Investments, crystalizes the dilemma of many Americans who want to use their savings in chunks to do things they’ve always wanted while health permits, but feel ashamed in doing so.

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Women Investors: Toss the Piggy Bank, Be Less Risk Averse

Research Shows Women’s Investment Anxiety Thwarts Financial Goals

(Rye, NY) – New research into women investors offers financial advisors insights to address the needs and growing demands of this varied market segment, especially risk-averse women investors who hold too many assets in cash, according to Hearts & Wallets, the preeminent financial research resource for understanding consumer savings and investing needs and behaviors.

Women investors hold far more cash than male investors, allocating on average 37 percent of assets to bank savings or checking accounts or CDs compared to 25 percent for men.1 Men have almost double the allocation in individual stock holdings of women – 13 percent versus 8 percent – and 15 percent the allocations in stock mutual funds, compared to women’s 10 percent allocation. Read More→